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Installation: Derivative Presence

Posted: May 5, 2014

Derivative Presence

Sound & Video Installation
by Yasmina Chavez & Javier Sanchez
 
Sound Installation:Donald H. Baepler Xeric Garden Marjorie Barrick Museum
May 5 - June 21, 2014, 10am - 4pm
 
Video Installation: TastySpace Gallery
Located inside Emergency Arts 520 Fremont Street 702-917-7855, call for hours
May 23 - June 21, 2014

Opening Reception at TastySpace Gallery Friday, May 23, 2014, 7pm-10pm

Derivative Presence is an exhibit about what “presence” means in this day and age. We no longer only exist in an interpersonal physical form or “face-to-face.” Through social media a post means “here.” This project explores what it is to be present now, which pertains to the unawareness of our pervasive presence forever accessible in a digital condition.

Technology has made our presence available to all at any time, in any place and in any number of multiple locations, which in itself redefines what presence means. Our physical being is unnecessary and a derivative of our presence is a valid experience of an interaction with each other. This is evidence that our world is changing and our being has adapted to embrace technology driven presence as human presence.

Derivative Presence will run in two locations for the duration of the exhibit. Randomly searched and found youtube videos of people communicating directly to their audience will be exhibited inside TastySpace Gallery as an invasive spatial installation. The original sound corresponding to those videos will fill the Xeric Garden environment at the Marjorie Barrick Museum creating an isolating sound experience.

Wherever you post, there you are!

The Concept of Presence: Explication Statement“[1] Presence (a shortened version of the term “telepresence”) is a psychological state or subjective perception in which even though part or all of an individual’s current experience is generated by and/or filtered through human- made technology, part or all of the individual’s perception fails to accurately acknowledge the role of the technology in the experience. Except in the most extreme cases, the individual can indicate correctly that s/he is using the technology, but at *some level* and to *some degree*, her/his perceptions overlook that knowledge and objects, events, entities, and environments are perceived as if the technology was not involved in the experience. Experience is defined as a person’s observation of and/or interaction with objects, entities, and/or events in her/his environment; perception, the result of perceiving, is defined as a meaningful interpretation of experience.” International Society for Presence Research. (2000).