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Minor in Classical Studies

A minor in Classical Studies is a very flexible program that allows you to organize and design a curriculum that best fits your interests. The minor has a language core curriculum, complemented by a variety of courses in literature, art, history, political science and philosophy, offered within and without the Department of World Languages and Cultures.

Learning Objectives

Communication

  • Students will be able to engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.
  • Students will be able to understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.
  • Students will be able to present information, concepts and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

Cultures

  • Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures studied.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products (artifacts) and perspectives of the cultures studied.

Connections

  • Students will be able to reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the foreign language.
  • Students will be able to acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Comparisons

  • Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own.

Communities

  • Students will be able to use the language both within and beyond the school setting.
  • Students will be able to show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.

Career Possibilities

Knowledge of Latin and Greek holds both scholarly and practical applications. Since an estimated 60 percent of English vocabulary comes from Latin, American students of classical languages indirectly gain a better understanding of their own language. A knowledge of Greek and Latin terminology provides direct access to a wealth of information in disparate areas, including literature, astronomy, medicine and natural sciences.